Editorial Board

 

Editor in Chief

GEORGE NOBLIT

George W. Noblit is the Joseph R. Neikirk Distinguished Professor of Sociology of Education at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is a Past President of the American Educational Studies Association and has had visiting professorships at the University of Granada, Spain, and Massey University, New Zealand, among others. His work has won awards including the Dina Feitelson Award for Outstanding Research from the International Reading Association and two Critics Choice Book Awards from the American Educational Studies Association for the books Late to Class (SUNY Press) and The Social Construction of Virtue (SUNY Press).

 

Dr. Noblit focuses on issues of race, social class, educational reform, qualitative research methods, and, more recently, the arts. He is the author or editor of 19 books, including The International Handbook of Urban Education (Springer) and The Future of Educational Studies (Peter Lang). His articles have appeared in journals including American Educational Research Journal, Educational Foundations, Educational Studies, and the Journal of Literacy Research. He is the longstanding co-editor of The Urban Review and two book series. He has been on the board of journals ranging from the Journal of Teacher Education to Creative Education and has served the American Educational Research Association and American Educational Studies Association on multiple committees.

 

 

 

Back To Top

Editorial Board

NATALIE ADAMS

is Professor in Educational Leadership and Foundations of Education and the Director of New College at the University of Alabama. She received her PhD in Curriculum and Instruction from Louisiana State University. Prior to earning her PhD, she was a middle school teacher in various public schools in South Louisiana. She is the co-author/co-editor of Geographies of Girlhood: Identities In-Between (with Pamela Bettis; Routledge); Learning to Teach: A Critical Approach to Field Experiences (with Christine Mary Shea; Routledge); and Cheerleader!: An American Icon (with Pamela Bettis; St. Martin’s Griffin). She serves on the Executive Council of the American Educational Studies Association and the Board of the David Mathews Center for Civic Life.

 

 

DENNIS BEACH

is Professor of Education at the Department of Education and Special Education at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden. His research interests attach to the transformation of Nordic countries into well-developed welfare states with emphatic systems for the delivery of public goods and services, creativity in education, youth and social exclusion, identity, learning and territorial stigmatization in post-industrial society. Recent research publications have been in the areas of individualization and educational inequality; the exploitation in higher education of an unacknowledged female academic labor power; and changes in teacher education in Sweden in the neo-liberal education age toward an occupation in itself and away from a profession for itself. He is currently chief editor of the international research journal of Ethnography and Education.

 

 

KATHY HYTTEN

is Professor of Educational Leadership at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. Previously, she taught at Southern Illinois University for 17 years. She received her PhD from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in Philosophy of Education. Hytten is a past president of the American Educational Studies Association and is on the editorial board of Educational Theory and Education and Culture. Her research focuses on the philosophy of education, social justice education, diversity, activism, and democratic education.

 

 

FARIDA KHAN

is a member of the Indian government's National Commission for Minorities. She received her Ph.D. in developmental psychology from the Graduate Center, City University of New York. Her research focuses on the social dimensions of mathematics education.

 

 

YUTO KITAMURA

is Associate Professor at Graduate School of Education at The University of Tokyo. He was Fulbright Scholar at the George Washington University, Visiting Professor at the University of Dhaka in Bangladesh, and is currently Special Advisor of the Rector at Royal University of Phnom Penh in Cambodia. Previously, he has worked in the Education Sector of UNESCO and taught at Nagoya University and Sophia University. He received his MA and PhD in education from University of California, Los Angeles. His recent publications include: Emerging International Dimensions in East Asian Higher Education (co-editor with Akiyoshi Yonezawa, Arthur Meerman, and Kazuo Kuroda; Springer) and The Political Economy of Educational Reforms and Capacity Development in Southeast Asia (co-editor with Yasushi Hirosato; Springer). Dr. Kitamura specializes in comparative education and educational development studies and has been conducting research on education policy in developing countries in Southeast Asia, with particular focus on Cambodia.

 

 

JO LAMPERT

is Professor in the School of Education at La Trobe University. She has an extensive background in teaching, publication, and research in equity and social justice, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander education, and children’s literature. Dr. Lampert has authored and co-edited several books including Teacher Education for High Poverty Schools (with Bruce Burnett; Springer), Introductory Indigenous Studies in Education: Reflection and the Importance of Knowing (with Jean Phillips; Pearson) and Children’s Books about 9/11: Ethnic, Heroic and National Identities (Routledge). She was co-director of Australia’s National Exceptional Teachers for Disadvantaged Schools (NETDS) Program and her current collaborative research focuses on teacher education for high poverty schools.

 

 

ALLAN LUKE

is Emeritus Professor of Education at Queensland University of Technology. He is Adjunct Professor at the Werklund School of Education at the University of Calgary; Honorary Professor in the Faculty of Education at Beijing Normal University; and Affiliated Professor in the Department of Language and Literacy Education at the University of British Columbia. He is a senior editor of The International Encyclopedia of Education (Elsevier), The Handbook of Urban Education (Kluwer), and The SAGE Handbook of Curriculum and Instruction (Sage). His research focuses on literacy, accountability and assessment, and comparative pedagogies.

 

 

JOSHUA KA HO MOK

is Chair Professor of Comparative Policy, concurrently Vice President of Lingnan University in Hong Kong. He was Vice President (Research and Development) and Founding Dean of Faculty of Liberal Arts and Social Sciences of Hong Kong Institute of Education before joining Lingnan University. He had also served as Associate Dean and Professor of Social Policy at the University of Hong Kong and as founding Chair Professor in East Asian Studies at the University of Bristol, where he established the Centre for East Asian Studies. He is a founding editor of the Journal of Asian Public Policy and the “Comparative Development and Policy in Asia” book series (Routledge). He has worked extensively in the fields of comparative education policy, comparative development and policy studies, and social development in contemporary China and East Asia.

 

 

LUIS C. MOLL

is Emeritus Professor in the Department of Teaching, Learning, and Sociocultural Studies and former Associate Dean for Academic Affairs for the College of Education at the University of Arizona. Previously, he worked at the Laboratory of Comparative Human Cognition and the Communication Department, both at the University of California, San Diego. Moll is a member of the National Academy of Education and is a Fellow of the American Educational Research Association. His research focuses on culture, psychology, and education; bilingualism and literacy; sociocultural theory; and qualitative methods.

 

 

WILLIAM T. PINK

is Professor Emeritus of Educational Policy and Leadership studies in the College of Education at Marquette University, where he has served as both department chair and as director of the doctoral program. He has published widely in the areas of delinquency, sociology of education, and educational reform. He has been the co-editor of The Urban Review (Springer) since 1978, co-editor of a book series entitled Understanding Education, Social Justice, and Policy (Hampton Press), and co-editor of the book series entitled Education, Equity, Economy (Springer), both with George Noblit. His most recent books are Cultural Matters: Lessons Learned from Field Studies of Several Leading School Reform Strategies (Hampton Press), the International Handbook of Urban Education (Springer), and Schools for Marginalized Youth: An International Perspective (Hampton Press).

 

 

PAULA GROVES PRICE

is Associate Dean for Diversity and International Programs and Associate Professor of Cultural Studies and Social Thought in Education in the College of Education at Washington State University. She received her PhD in Social Foundations of Education from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Price is the editor of The Western Journal of Black Studies. Her research focuses on equity and justice in education, critical race studies, cultural studies in education, youth leadership and activism, and diversity in teacher and leadership preparation.

 

 

UMESH SHARMA

is Associate Professor in the Faculty of Education at Monash University, Australia. He is the chief co-editor of the Australasian Journal of Special Education. He is author of about 100 academic articles, book chapters, and edited books that mainly focus on various aspects of inclusive education. His most recent co-authored/co-edited books include A Guide to Promoting a Positive Classroom Environment (with John Roodenburg and Steve Rayner; Sense Publishers) and Special Education International Perspectives: Practices across the Globe (with Anthony F Rotatori, Jeffrey P. Bakken, Festus Obiakor, and Sandra Burkhardt; Emerald Books). Sharma has written policy documents for Ministries of Education in Australia, Bangladesh, India, Solomon Islands, and New Zealand on education of children with disabilities. He is leading a large international project across 14 Pacific countries aimed at developing a set of contextually specific inclusive education indicators. His main areas of research interests are inclusive education in developing countries, inclusive teacher education, and attitude and efficacy measurement.

 

 

PAT THOMSON

Pat Thomson is Professor of Education in the School of Education and Convenor of the Centre for Research in Arts, Creativity and Literacies; and Director of the Centre for Advanced Studies (faculties of Arts and Social Sciences) at the University of Nottingham. She is an Adjunct Professor at the Free State University, South Africa; Visiting Professor at the University of Iceland; a Visiting Professor at Deakin University; and a visiting Associate in the School of Education, University of Western Ontario. She is an editor of the international peer refereed journal Educational Action Research (Taylor and Francis) and serves on the board of numerous scholarly journals. Her research focuses on creativity, the arts and change in schools and communities, postgraduate writing pedagogies, social justice, and teacher research.

 

 

 

Back To Top

Advisory Board

BELMIRA BUENO

is Dean of the School of Education at the University of São Paulo and researcher at the National Counsel of Technological and Scientific Development (CNPq). Professor Bueno received her PhD from the School of Education at the University of São Paulo and did postdoctoral work at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where she was also Visiting Scholar. Her research is on the teaching profession and teacher education, including the use of information and communication technologies.

 

 

RATTANA BUOSONTE

is a professor of educational research and evaluation in the Faculty of Education at Naresuan University, Thailand. Since 1999 he has been head of the Ph.D. program in educational research and evaluation. His research interests include corruption in educational management in Thailand, university governance in Thailand, and evaluation theory.

 

 

PENNY ENSLIN

is Professor of Education and Director of the Doctor of Education program in the School of Education at the University of Glasgow. She is Emeritus Professor in the School of Education at the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg. Her research focuses on education for democratic citizenship; gender and education; liberalism; higher education; deliberative democracy; cosmopolitanism; global justice; peace education; and social justice.

 

 

ANDREW HARGREAVES

is Thomas More Brennan Chair in Education at the Lynch School of Education at Boston College. Previously, he taught at the University of Toronto, where he co-directed the International Center for Educational Change, and the University of Nottingham. He is the President-Elect of the International Congress for School Effectiveness and Improvement and Adviser in Education to the Premier of Ontario. Professor Hargreaves received the Grawemeyer Award and AACTE Outstanding Book Award for his recent book, Professional Capital (with Michael Fullan; Teachers College Press). His research focuses on professional capital in teaching, educational change, and uplifting leadership.

 

 

MOSHE JUSTMAN

is Professor of Economics and former Dean of the Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences at Ben-Gurion University, where he has taught since 1982, a member of the Academic Committee of the Van Leer Jerusalem Institute, and Professorial Research Fellow at the Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research. Justman has served as Chair of the Committee on Education Indicators of the Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities and as a consultant to the Israeli Ministry of Education. He was a Visiting Professor at Carnegie Mellon University, China People's University (Renmin), and Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, and an Ameritech Fellow at Case Western Reserve University. Professor Justman’s areas of research include the economics of education, social mobility and income distribution; the economics of innovation and technology policy; and regional development. He holds a doctorate in economics from Harvard University.

 

 

MICHAEL KEHLER

is Associate Professor in the Faculty of Education at Western University, Canada. His research focuses on the intersections between gender, schooling and health; and sociology of the body. Kehler is the co-editor of Boys’ Bodies: Speaking the Unspoken (with Michael Atkinson; Peter Lang) Boy Culture: An Encyclopedia (with Shirley Steinberg and Lindsay Cornish; Greenwood Press), and The Problem with Boys’ Education: Beyond the Backlash (with Wayne Martino and Marcus Weaver-Hightower; Routledge). He received his PhD in Education from Michigan State University.

 

 

OLIVE MUGENDA

is Vice-Chancellor of Kenyatta University, where she has also served as Head of Department and Dean of Faculty. She received her PhD in Family Studies and Consumer Economics from Iowa State University. She is Chair of the Association of Commonwealth Universities, Vice-President of the International Association of Universities, and Chair of the Kenya Home Economics Association. Her research focuses on girls’ and women’s education, home economics, statistics, and research methodology.

 

 

ENRIQUE MURILLO

is Professor of Teacher Education and Foundations Department in the College of Education at California State University, San Bernardino. He completed his PhD in the Social Foundations of Education program at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His specialty areas include foundations of education, research methods, critical ethnography, educational anthropology and cultural studies. He is the founding editor of the Journal of Latinos and Education and editor-in-chief of the Handbook of Latinos and Education (Routledge). Additionally, he is the founder of the National Latino Education Network (NLEN). Dr. Murillo currently serves as Executive Director and Founder of the LEAD organization (Latino Education & Advocacy Days), housed in the College of Education at CSUSB, whose objective is to promote a broad-based awareness of the crisis in Latino Education and to enhance the intellectual, cultural and personal development of our community's educators, administrators, leaders and students.

 

 

GARY PATTILLO

is a Research and Instructional Services Librarian at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He serves as the library liaison to the UNC School of Education. He is the editor of the "Fast Facts" column for College & Research Libraries News, a publication of the Association of College & Research Libraries. Gary earned his MSLIS at the University of Texas at Austin.

 

 

PETER ROBERTS

is Professor of Education and Director of the Educational Theory, Policy and Practice Research Hub at the University of Canterbury in New Zealand. He has also taught at the University of Auckland and the University of Waikato. His primary areas of scholarship are philosophy of education and educational policy studies. Peter is the Immediate Past President of the Philosophy of Education Society of Australasia. In 2010 he was a Canterbury Fellow at the University of Oxford, and in 2012 he was a Rutherford Visiting Scholar at Trinity College, Cambridge.

 

 

J. C. SHIN

is Coordinator of Educational Administration & Policy Studies and Professor in the Department of Education at Seoul National University. He received his PhD in Educational Leadership and Policy Studies from Florida State University. Professor Shin is Co-Editor in Chief of International Encyclopedia of Higher Education (with Pedro Teixeira; Springer), book series editor of Knowledge Studies in Higher Education (Springer). His research interests are higher education policy, academic profession, organization studies, and knowledge and social development.

 

 

TIMOTHY TEO

is Associate Dean and Professor of Education in the Faculty of Education and Director of the Educational Research Center at the University of Macau, China. He is also Honorary Professor of Education in the School of Learning, Development and Professional Practice at the University of Auckland. He is editor-in-chief of the International Journal of Quantitative Research in Education and The Asia-Pacific Education Researcher. His research interests include educational psychology, ICT in Education, music education, and quantitative methods.

 

 

CHRISTA VAN KRAAYENOORD

is an Associate Professor in the School of Education at The University of Queensland. Her research focuses on literacy and literacy learning of all students; the writing of individuals with developmental disabilities and learning difficulties; the relationship between metacognition and reading; literacy-related motivation and engagement; literacy assessment and reporting; whole school change in literacy; and teacher knowledge and teacher professional learning in literacy. She is the President of the International Academy for Research in Learning Disabilities.

 

 

 

Back To Top